Vitamins

VitaminB9



Last update: 2.5.2017.

Necessary for fertility

Supplement Watch - Vitamin B9

Other name(s) for Vitamin B9

Folic Acid, folate, folacin

General information for Vitamin B9

Vitamin B9 is essential for numerous bodily functions. The human body needs it to synthesize DNA, repair DNA, and methylate DNA as well as to act as a cofactor in certain biological reactions. B9 is especially important during infancy and pregnancy when it is needed in aiding rapid cell division and growth. Fotate is also requited to produce healthy red blood cells and prevent anemia.

Solubility of Vitamin B9

Water

All B vitamins are water soluble.

Benefits of Vitamin B9

Vital for new cell creation. Helps prevent brain and spine birth defects when taken early in pregnancy and thus should be taken regularly by all women of child-bearing age since women may not know they are pregnant in the first weeks of pregnancy. Can lower levels of homocysteine and may reduce heart disease risk. May reduce risk for colon cancer. Offsets breast cancer risk among women who consume alcohol.

Deficiency symptoms / disease

Megaloblastic anemia
Deficiency during pregnancy is associated with birth defects


May lead to glossitis, diarrhea, depression, confusion and anemia.
Alcohol consuption accelerated deficiency.

Overdose symptoms / disease

Since Vitamin B9 is water soluble the toxicity is low.

FDA information for Vitamin B9

(Daily value/Recommended dietary allowance/Adequate intake)

Recommended intakes of nutrients vary by age and gender and are known as Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) and Adequate Intakes (AIs). However, one value for each nutrient, known as the Daily Value (DV), is selected for the labels of dietary supplements and foods. A DV is often, but not always, similar to one's RDA or AI for that nutrient. DVs were developed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to help consumers determine the level of various nutrients in a standard serving of food in relation to their approximate requirement for it. The label actually provides the %DV so that you can see how much (what percentage) a serving of the product contributes to reaching the DV.

Data from U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, National Institutes of Health, Daily values.

FDA general vitamin facts

FDA Vitamin name: Folate

FDA Vitamin aliases:

FDA Note: Also known as: Folic acid Folacin Pteroylpolyglutamates Note: Given as dietary folate equivalents (DFE). 1 DFE = 1 μg food folate = 0.6 μg of folate from fortified food or as a supplement consumed with food = 0.5 μg of a supplement taken on an empty stomach.

FDA Function: Coenzyme in the metabolism of nucleic and amino acids; prevents megaloblastic anemia.

FDA recommended dietary allowance / adequate intake

For infants from 0 to 6 months: 65*μg/d (AI).

For infants from 7 to 12 months: 80*μg/d (AI).

For children from 1 to 3 years: 150μg/d (RDA).

For children from 4 to 8 years: 200μg/d (RDA).

For males from 9 to 13 years: 300μg/d (RDA).

For males from 14 to 18 years: 400μg/d (RDA).

For males from 19 to 30 years: 400μg/d (RDA).

For males from 31 to 50 years: 400μg/d (RDA).

For males from 50 to 70 years: 400μg/d (RDA).

For males from 70 ears: 400μg/d (RDA).

For females from 9 to 13 years: 300μg/d (RDA).

For females from 14 to 18 years: 400μg/d (RDA).

For females from 19 to 30 years: 400μg/d (RDA).

For females from 31 to 50 years: 400μg/d (RDA).

For females from 50 to 70 years: 400μg/d (RDA).

For females from 70 years: 400μg/d (RDA).

For pregnant under 18 years: 600μg/d (RDA).

For pregnant from 19 to 30 years: 600μg/d (RDA).

For pregnant from 31 to 50 years: 600μg/d (RDA).

For lactating under 18 years: 500μg/d (RDA).

For lactating from 19 to 30 years: 500μg/d (RDA).

For lactating from 31 to 50 years: 500μg/d (RDA).

FDA Upper limit

For infants from 0 to 6 months: ND bμg/d.

For infants from 7 to 12 months: NDμg/d.

For children from 1 to 3 years: 300μg/d.

For children from 4 to 8 years: 400μg/d.

For males from 9 to 13 years: 600μg/d.

For males from 14 to 18 years: 800μg/d.

For males from 19 to 30 years: 1000μg/d.

For males from 31 to 50 years: 1000μg/d.

For males from 50 to 70 years: 1000μg/d.

For males from 70 ears: 1000μg/d.

For females from 9 to 13 years: 600μg/d.

For females from 14 to 18 years: 800μg/d.

For females from 19 to 30 years: 1000μg/d.

For females from 31 to 50 years: 1000μg/d.

For females from 50 to 70 years: 1000μg/d.

For females from 70 years: 1000μg/d.

For pregnant under 18 years: 800μg/d.

For pregnant from 19 to 30 years: 1000μg/d.

For pregnant from 31 to 50 years: 1000μg/d.

For lactating under 18 years: 800μg/d.

For lactating from 19 to 30 years: 1000μg/d.

For lactating from 31 to 50 years: 1000μg/d.

Food sources for Vitamin B9

Black eyed peas

Cooked lentils

Raw spinach

Aspargus

Lettuce

Avocados

Broccoli

Mango

Oranges

External links

Wikipedia-Folic acid MedlinePlus-Vitamin B MedlinePlus-Vitamin Folic Acid