Vitamins

VitaminC



Last update: 2.5.2017.

The best known vitamin

Supplement Watch - Vitamin C

Other name(s) for Vitamin C

Ascorbic acid

General information for Vitamin C

Vitamin C is an essential nutrient. It is a cofactor in at least eight enzymatic reactions, including several collagen synthesis reactions that, when dysfunctional, cause the most severe symptoms of scurvy. Vitamin C is found in high concentrations in immune cells, and is consumed quickly during infections but it is not certain how vitamin C interacts with the immune system.

Solubility of Vitamin C

Water

Vitamin C

Benefits of Vitamin C

Foods rich in vitamin C may lower the risk for some cancers (mouth, esophagus, stomach, and breast). Long-term use of supplemental vitamin C may protect against cataracts. Helps make collagen, a connective tissue that knits together wounds and supports blood vessel walls. Helps make the neurotransmitters serotonin and norepinephrine. Acts as an antioxidant, neutralizing unstable molecules that can damage cells. Bolsters the immune system.

Deficiency symptoms / disease

Scurvy

Overdose symptoms / disease

Diarrhea
Nausea
Vomiting
Heartburn
Abdominal bloating
Cramps
Headache
Insomnia
Kidney stones

FDA information for Vitamin C

(Daily value/Recommended dietary allowance/Adequate intake)

Recommended intakes of nutrients vary by age and gender and are known as Recommended Dietary Allowances (RDAs) and Adequate Intakes (AIs). However, one value for each nutrient, known as the Daily Value (DV), is selected for the labels of dietary supplements and foods. A DV is often, but not always, similar to one's RDA or AI for that nutrient. DVs were developed by the U.S. Food and Drug Administration (FDA) to help consumers determine the level of various nutrients in a standard serving of food in relation to their approximate requirement for it. The label actually provides the %DV so that you can see how much (what percentage) a serving of the product contributes to reaching the DV.

Data from U.S. Department of Health & Human Services, National Institutes of Health, Daily values.

FDA general vitamin facts

FDA Vitamin name: Vitamin C

FDA Vitamin aliases: Ascorbic acid Dehydroascorbic acid (DHA)

FDA Note:

FDA Function: Cofactor for reactions requiring reduced copper or iron metalloenzyme and as a protective antioxidant.

FDA recommended dietary allowance / adequate intake

For infants from 0 to 6 months: 40*mg/d (AI).

For infants from 7 to 12 months: 50*mg/d (AI).

For children from 1 to 3 years: 15mg/d (RDA).

For children from 4 to 8 years: 25mg/d (RDA).

For males from 9 to 13 years: 45mg/d (RDA).

For males from 14 to 18 years: 75mg/d (RDA).

For males from 19 to 30 years: 90mg/d (RDA).

For males from 31 to 50 years: 90mg/d (RDA).

For males from 50 to 70 years: 90mg/d (RDA).

For males from 70 ears: 90mg/d (RDA).

For females from 9 to 13 years: 45mg/d (RDA).

For females from 14 to 18 years: 65mg/d (RDA).

For females from 19 to 30 years: 75mg/d (RDA).

For females from 31 to 50 years: 75mg/d (RDA).

For females from 50 to 70 years: 75mg/d (RDA).

For females from 70 years: 75mg/d (RDA).

For pregnant under 18 years: 80mg/d (RDA).

For pregnant from 19 to 30 years: 85mg/d (RDA).

For pregnant from 31 to 50 years: 85mg/d (RDA).

For lactating under 18 years: 115mg/d (RDA).

For lactating from 19 to 30 years: 120mg/d (RDA).

For lactating from 31 to 50 years: 120mg/d (RDA).

FDA Upper limit

For infants from 0 to 6 months: ND bmg/d.

For infants from 7 to 12 months: NDmg/d.

For children from 1 to 3 years: 400mg/d.

For children from 4 to 8 years: 650mg/d.

For males from 9 to 13 years: 1200mg/d.

For males from 14 to 18 years: 1800mg/d.

For males from 19 to 30 years: 2000mg/d.

For males from 31 to 50 years: 2000mg/d.

For males from 50 to 70 years: 2000mg/d.

For males from 70 ears: 2000mg/d.

For females from 9 to 13 years: 1200mg/d.

For females from 14 to 18 years: 1800mg/d.

For females from 19 to 30 years: 2000mg/d.

For females from 31 to 50 years: 2000mg/d.

For females from 50 to 70 years: 2000mg/d.

For females from 70 years: 2000mg/d.

For pregnant under 18 years: 1800mg/d.

For pregnant from 19 to 30 years: 2000mg/d.

For pregnant from 31 to 50 years: 2000mg/d.

For lactating under 18 years: 1800mg/d.

For lactating from 19 to 30 years: 2000mg/d.

For lactating from 31 to 50 years: 2000mg/d.

Food sources for Vitamin C

Peppers

Guavas

Dark green and leafy vegetables

Kiwi

Broccoli

Berries

Citrus fruits

Peas

Papaya

External links

Wikipedia-Vitamin C MedlinePlus-Vitamin C